Teaching Yourself – A Covid (or Otherwise) Guide

Now, more than ever, students find themselves teaching much of the content they’re taking courses for – to themselves. Maybe the professor’s teaching style isn’t compatible with your learning style, you need additional help, you want to get ahead, or you’re doing online school. At one point in the semester, many students find that they have to rely on themselves for one reason or the other – what do you do in this situation? With the current ongoing pandemic, these situations can become even more common. As someone who’s done online learning even before college and corona was a problem, here are my tips for overcoming problems in this situation.

Things to Consider if You’re Taking Classes at Institutions Other Than Your University

Wherever you go to school, there’s bound to be those notable, extremely difficult classes that many majors end up having to take. These classes can bring your GPA down, be unorganized, or simply not at the depth you want to learn the material at. Whatever your reason is, for many of these popular and commonly-taken classes (often prerequisites, but upper-levels are also usually included) you will have options to take these classes elsewhere and fulfill the requirement required by your institution.

The Importance of Speaking with an Advisor and Fact-Checking

Once you get to university, talking to an advisor might not be at the top of your list. Maybe you’ve spent some time getting to know your major and the coursework it entails, and you know exactly what you’re going to do. That’s great! However, a major resource that can often be overlooked at university is the resource that comes with connecting with an advisor who understands your goals and guides you to achieve them.

3 Benefits of Mentoring

We’ve all been there – in need of someone to guide us through a process, whether that be school-related, such as the college application process, or something personal that you seek someone’s opinion on. It’s impossible that we don’t require help at some point – and at each stage in our life, we will always look to those more older, experienced, and knowledgeable than us. There is a certain comfort to knowing that no matter how old you get, you can always find help in a mentor. In this article, I’ll outline benefits to mentoring – a process that benefits both the mentor and mentee, and is extremely rewarding.

The Unhealthy Aspects of College Life

Unhealthy habits can easily develop in college, and many times, they’re almost seen as a given, a rite, or something that is an inevitable part of college life. Perhaps you’ve even dealt with it in high school; hearing how little someone slept last night and comparing your own two hours, skipping breakfast, signing up for way too many extracurriculars, and overall, completely draining yourself. For many of us, this comes easy, and we’re used to these habits, to the point where it doesn’t seem like there’s anything wrong with it.

Dealing with Food Insecurity In College

College is expensive, and that’s the easiest way to say it. Along with tuition, many students face problems with housing, books and supplies, and food insecurity. Students have long, often hard days with mentally tasking subjects and assignments, and to have the energy for those tasks, they have to eat. Meal plans can be extremely expensive on top of tuition, and eating out every day isn’t feasible for a wallet, especially in a college town where prices can often be inflated. How do you deal with a problem like this, a seemingly unending problem that you have to solve at least three times a day? Below, I’ll give tips for dealing with food insecurity in college, and ways to combat it.

Balancing Schoolwork With Other Obligations

As students, we’re often working on multiple assignments at once. Deadlines for classes tend to overlap, and we spend some time each week figuring out how to best utilize our time for the dozens of things we have to do. This can be a harder process to figure out if you’re balancing work, extracurriculars, studying for a standardized test, as well as personal life. Sometimes, we feel that we don’t have enough hours in the day for all our responsibilities, and we end up neglecting our obligations. I have run into the same problem various times over the years. Below, I will be giving my tips for maintaining a balance in your life.

Taking Risks and Being Spontaneous in Academic Life

There is a certain thrill to life in being spontaneous – impromptu adventures and last-minute plans can often end up being the most memorable. But how do you apply spontaneity to school and college life, a lifestyle that can seem so rigid and structured? In this article, I’ll give you my tips on how to have this approach towards your studies.

3 Tips for Writing College Admission Essays

It’s that time of the year, and rising seniors are usually spending their summer months writing – or at least, thinking – about what their college essay is going to look like. I’ve previously written about ways you can find inspiration for these essays, and in this post, I’ll be talking about general tips for these challenging parts of the college application process.

OP-ED: Using Social Media as an Academic Resource

If you’re a student in this day and age, you’re probably on some sort of social media. You might spend a couple of hours every day on it, surfing the web while simultaneously getting your news, entertainment, and social interaction from it. Despite the negative stereotypes attached to social media, it can also be of great benefit. 

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